"licensed agent" and other consultants

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Daugher of Vet, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. My mother moved into assisted living last year and while my sister was there, she heard someone in the office talking about A&A benefit for widows. She made an initial appointment with the gentleman, who apparently is also a financial consultant. He was very helpful about how to answer questions for regarding Mom's need for assistance. He said he was helping families as a public service, no charge, etc.

    I told my sister I was uncomfortable just giving this guy all of Mom's personal info...couldn't we get the paperwork etc. I didn't think we should just give him copies, etc.

    She emailed him and we have both left phone calls for him and his partner...who has "licensed agent" on the buisness card he has prepared for promoting his services. They have not returned our calls. In the meantime, I met a person from the Veteran's Administration who is being very helpful...he works in a government office, etc.

    In our correspondence we were just asking the 2 volunteers to point us to the rest of the paperwork.

    I'm curious...if you aren't taking your paperwork to an established elder attorney law office, are there some precautions we need to take if we use some other person? One Veteran is under the impression the "licensed agent" is "with the Navy." I did hear one law office rep say they would file all paperwork and follow up for $800.
     
  2. veteranadvocate

    veteranadvocate Full Member

    My mother moved into assisted living last year and while my sister was there, she heard someone in the office talking about A&A benefit for widows. She made an initial appointment with the gentleman, who apparently is also a financial consultant. He was very helpful about how to answer questions for regarding Mom's need for assistance. He said he was helping families as a public service, no charge, etc.

    Most of these financial consultants will answer questions about VA benefits pertaining to Aid and Attendance but they usually recoup their cost through investing assets for the veteran and/or widow. Some of the ‘assisted living facilities’ will pay for the filing of VA benefits in order to assist the veteran/widow to obtain additional income and be able to stay at their facility.

    I told my sister I was uncomfortable just giving this guy all of Mom's personal info...couldn't we get the paperwork etc. I didn't think we should just give him copies, etc.

    She emailed him and we have both left phone calls for him and his partner...who has "licensed agent" on the buisness card he has prepared for promoting his services. They have not returned our calls. In the meantime, I met a person from the Veteran's Administration who is being very helpful...he works in a government office, etc.

    The ‘licensed agent’ issue must be related to their financial service because there are no ‘licensed agents’ for the VA.

    In our correspondence we were just asking the 2 volunteers to point us to the rest of the paperwork.

    If they actually filed a claim for your Mother, she can request the VA to make copies and return the originals. If the two volunteers did not file the application then you may inform the ‘assisted care facility’ of your concerns and problems. Request that they contact these individuals for the requested documents or your Mother will contact the State Attorney General’s Office to file a complaint. I am sure you will see a quick response.


    I'm curious...if you aren't taking your paperwork to an established elder attorney law office, are there some precautions we need to take if we use some other person? One Veteran is under the impression the "licensed agent" is "with the Navy." I did hear one law office rep say they would file all paperwork and follow up for $800.

    The biggest thing to keep in mind is that whoever files the application, the correct information is the applicant’s responsibility. Even if a government employee completes the application with the wrong info and your Mother sign the application, she will be held responsible for any overpayments created.

    The Veteran Advocate
     

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